Sony A7s III: will have a global shutter sensor?

ByLinky Johnson 2019-05-02 711

The Sony A7s III is rumored to be presented in autumn 2019 - and possibly comes with Global Shutter.

Sony A7s III earliest in autumn

The fact that the A7s III is not to be presented at NAB 2019 now seems to be confirmed. Sonyalpharumors has learned from a reliable source that the A7s III will probably be presented in autumn 2019. Another source also confirms that the A7s III should not be expected until autumn 2019 at the earliest.

 

This means that it will take a few more months until the A7s III will come onto the market. And as Sony is well known, it would certainly be conceivable that the new DSLM will not be introduced until 2020 after all.

New sensor with Global Shutter?

Sony announced last year in an interview that the A7s III will take much longer to develop. Now the already mentioned source gives hints what exactly this development time is needed for. It says that the Sony A7s III should be equipped with a new "Memory stacked Sensor", which can be called a big innovation and game changer.

 

How exactly this big innovation will look like, we don't know at the moment. But many people suspect that it could be a sensor with a global shutter - which would be a really exciting innovation, especially for videographers, who will be talking about the Sony A7s III among other things.

 

Personally, I could very well imagine that Sony would like to offer the A7s III with Global Shutter in order to once again have a clear competitive advantage over the competition, which has caught up strongly in the video sector in recent months. And in the last few months Sony has already presented various sensors with Global Shutter, only a full format sensor was not included as far as I know.

What is a Global Shutter?

For a sensor with Global Shutter, the exposure time for all pixels begins and ends simultaneously. This is not the case with a conventional CMOS sensor with rolling shutter, where the individual rows on the sensor are exposed one after the other. This can lead to unwanted "distortions" and the so-called rolling shutter effect during fast movements and panning.

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